Staying on a Ranch

We’re currently staying on a horse ranch near Portland, nearly a month into our giant road trip. We didn’t know what to expect when we booked the place, but it’s absolutely incredible.

The boys have really enjoyed exploring the place, and we’ve really enjoyed photographing them!

Today I wanted to share a few of the shots I’ve taken here, with a bit of a twist. Many of them will be straight out of camera – no editing done. I don’t usually do that, since unedited photos often don’t look great. But one reason we’ve switched over to the Fujifilm system of cameras recently was for the look of the out-of-camera files. So I figured sharing a few would be helpful to anyone looking into Fujifilm cameras!

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How to Tell When You’ve Done Too Much Editing Avoid these big editing mistakes with your photos!


Please note: This is too much editing.

Oh do I have a love/hate relationship with editing. On the one hand, it can bring the best out of your images, and help you get that “WOW!” reaction.

But on the other hand, do too much editing, and that reaction can quickly turn to “Um, gross”. Or maybe that’s just my reaction. But too much editing, or poor editing, can do more harm to your photos than if you just left them alone.

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Photo Review: An Evening With The Boys

The other night there was some beautiful golden light filling the kitchen as the boys played. After a long, dark winter, this was a sight for sore eyes. So I grabbed the camera and spent some time photographing them as they went about their business – Max doing some art-making, and Oliver practicing his new walking skills.

I learn so much about photography when I shoot, and review the images afterwards. So I made a short video showing some of my favourite shots from the evening, and my thoughts on the shooting experience, resulting images, and the process of editing them in Lightroom.

Highlights include:

  • Pros and cons of shooting at super wide apertures
  • The problems with adding too much contrast to a black and white
  • How my approach to acceptable sharpness has changed
  • When a dark image works (and when it doesn’t)
  • And more!

Take a gander, and let me know what you think!

How to Purchase the Standalone Version of Lightroom

Adobe has made it a bit tricky to purchase the standalone version of Lightroom. Watch the video above to see how to do it.

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6 Features That Should Have Been In Lightroom 6 (But Aren’t)

Lightroom 6 (aka Lightroom CC) was just announced (click here to find out what’s new!). I’ve been eagerly waiting for this release – pretty much from the moment Lightroom 5 was announced. And I have to be honest: I’m disappointed. Here’s what’s up.

From where I stand, it seems like significant development on Lightroom has stalled. Lightroom 6 is a fairly incremental update from Lightroom 5. Yes, there are some new features (like HDR, pano merge, GPU performance boost, facial recognition, etc.), but none of them are particularly innovative. Add to that the fact that Lightroom 5 was also a pretty incremental update from Lightroom 4 and you can see that it’s been a long time since anything really revolutionary has happened with this software. The biggest problem is that there are major areas that have been needing improvement for years, but have been mostly ignored.

So here’s a list of the features I think Lightroom 6 should have had…

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What You Need To Know About Lightroom 6 (aka Lightroom CC)

Lightroom 6 (also called Lightroom CC) was just announced this morning (Tuesday April 21, 2015). It’s available as a standalone product (Lightroom 6), as well as a part of the Adobe Creative Cloud program (Lightroom CC). Here’s what you need to know about this latest version of Lightroom.

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7 Qualities of Stunning Black and Whites

If you’re like me, you love a great black and white image. See, when you remove the color from a photo, magic can happen. A person’s expression is suddenly imbued with more meaning. A cool composition becomes more bold, more dramatic. And our images gain a timelessness that allows our viewers to focus on messages that transcend the here and now.

But how do you determine which photos you should convert to black and white? Gut feeling? Scientific testing? Some secret list of requirements that are revealed only after reaching the 10th level of Photography Mastery?

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